“Growing” 3D printed objects

I found this demonstration and talk by Joseph DeSimone of Carbon 3D, explaining a new method of 3D printing where the elements are sort of “grown”, really interesting.

I’ve been fortunate enough in my current role to be able to explore 3D printing—working with great peeps like Mel Fuller from Three Farm and Matthew Connolly from me3D in teaching this technology to young folks.

It’s really piqued my interest—I’m fascinated by the possibilities. I’ve been looking into various approaches to 3D printing bikes (perhaps unsurprisingly!), among other things. But I also see potential in creating parts for things like robotics projects.

One of my “alternate lives” would be an industrial designer. I’ve long had an interest in building things in real life (starting with my love of LEGO, but extending to radio control cars, and dreams of being a robotics engineer at one point). But I’ve never quite had the skills or equipment to pull that off. I thought about heading back into study of industrial design at one point, but wasn’t quite convinced it was the right path for me.

What I’m finding most inspiring/interesting about 3D printing is that it brings into reach many of things that I always dreamt of being able to do. I was very excited recently to be able to 3D print an iPhone stand for a custom application at work. Not knowing how to use the software at the start of the day, we were able to get a first prototype designed and printed within the space of a few hours.

Speed and strength are two key issues with the resulting output for some applications. For example, if I was still actively working on RC cars, I can see countless opportunities for customisations and enhancements using 3D printed parts, but they would need to be quite strong.

The Carbon 3D technology is much faster, supports a wide range of source materials, and is stronger—so seems to address a lot of those issues.

I also think about applying this sort of thing to creating the robot pieces that I envisaged when I was a youngster, attempting (unsuccessfully) to build a robot with an articulated arm out of wood.

Combined with my ongoing interest with robots and technologies like the Raspberry Pi and Arduino, I see the potential to fulfil those childhood/teenage dreams.

Suffice to say I’m finding the whole “digital making” space very inspiring at a personal level (and wishing I had more time in my professional capacity to explore and play with the tech that we’re teaching at IDX!)